According To The Agreement Signed

Each contracting party must be a “competent person” who is legitimate. The parties may be natural persons (“individuals”) or legal persons (“limited communities”). An agreement is reached when an “offer” is accepted. The parties must intend to be legally bound; and, to be valid, the agreement must have both an appropriate “form” and a legitimate purpose. In England (and in jurisdictions that apply English contractual principles), parties must also exchange “considerations” to create “reciprocity of engagement,” as in simpkins v Country. [40] Where a contract is based on an unlawful object or is contrary to public policy, it is void. In the 1996 Canadian case Royal Bank of Canada v. Newell[118] a woman forged her husband`s signature and her husband agreed to assume “all responsibility and responsibility” for the forged checks. In contrast, in Merritt vs. Merritt, the General Court enforced an agreement between an alienated couple, because the circumstances indicated that their agreement must have legal consequences. . .

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